THE WHY

The path to Navigating Courage began in 2016 at the International Leadership Association (ILA) Conference in Atlanta, Ga. It was not long after the Charleston Church murders. My session, “Leading Beyond Hate to Healing: Leveraging The Power of Communication and Connections,” was directly in response to that act of terror.

 

Before I presented, my colleagues and I asked audience members what they hoped to learn from the session. One by one, they stood and spoke variations on these three themes:

 

“I want to really do something and learn how to be more Courageous.”

“I want to learn how to use my voice and privilege towards social change.”

“I want to learn how to become a courageous leader.”

 

I listened intently to their anguish, authenticity and hurt. I heard them yearning for ways to help in the fight toward a more just and equitable world and end racism once and for all. And I wrote one word on a note card:

 

Courage

 

As I wrote, my focus sharpened to the single syllable at the end of my pen: RAGE

 

That moment marked the beginning of my exploration of the idea that a level of rage is, quite literally, embedded into the very essence of real courage. In my resulting series of lectures, essays and book, I distinguish between being mad or upset and the deeper concept of rage. Individuals may be angered and upset about their individual circumstance(s), but when they are enraged, outraged, or raging about a circumstance, it is often because they see their individual circumstance within the context of larger systems or oppressive structures. Seen through that focal lens, CouRage is not about an individual; CouRage is about community. It includes social justice, upending oppressive structures and fighting for our shared humanity.

 

Navigating CouRage: Leading Beyond Fear explores these intertwined concepts. It documents my personal and professional journey as a Black woman navigating both my Courage and my Rage and provides inspiration and practical guidance to other leaders who seek to own their courage and lead beyond their personal fears.

 

 

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The path to Navigating Courage began in 2016 at the International Leadership Association (ILA) Conference in Atlanta, Ga. It was not long after the Charleston Church murders. My session, “Leading Beyond Hate to Healing: Leveraging The Power of Communication and Connections,” was directly in response to that act of terror.

 

Before I presented, my colleagues and I asked audience members what they hoped to learn from the session. One by one, they stood and spoke variations on these three themes:

 

“I want to really do something and learn how to be more Courageous.”

“I want to learn how to use my voice and privilege towards social change.”

“I want to learn how to become a courageous leader.”

 

I listened intently to their anguish, authenticity and hurt. I heard them yearning for ways to help in the fight toward a more just and equitable world and end racism once and for all. And I wrote one word on a note card:

 

Courage

 

As I wrote, my focus sharpened to the single syllable at the end of my pen: RAGE

 

That moment marked the beginning of my exploration of the idea that a level of rage is, quite literally, embedded into the very essence of real courage. In my resulting series of lectures, essays and book, I distinguish between being mad or upset and the deeper concept of rage. Individuals may be angered and upset about their individual circumstance(s), but when they are enraged, outraged, or raging about a circumstance, it is often because they see their individual circumstance within the context of larger systems or oppressive structures. Seen through that focal lens, CouRage is not about an individual; CouRage is about community. It includes social justice, upending oppressive structures and fighting for our shared humanity.

 

Navigating CouRage: Leading Beyond Fear explores these intertwined concepts. It documents my personal and professional journey as a Black woman navigating both my Courage and my Rage and provides inspiration and practical guidance to other leaders who seek to own their courage and lead beyond their personal fears.